Hawaii island Guide

Waikoloa Beach Resort

The island of Hawaii is the youngest and largest island in the Hawaiian chain. Nearly twice as big as all of the other Hawaiian Islands combined (hence, its nickname, “Big Island”), its sheer size is awe-inspiring. You can travel through all but four of the world's different climate zones there, ranging from Wet Tropical to Polar Tundra, a result of the shielding effect and elevations of the massive volcanoes Maunakea and Maunaloa. From the molten magma flowing at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to the snow-capped heights of Maunakea; from the lush valleys of the Hamakua Coast to the jet-black sands of Punaluu Beach, the island of Hawaii is an unrivaled expression of the power of nature. However you decide to experience the island, it is sure to leave you humbled!  

 

Nestled among the dramatic black lava fields of South Kohala, on the sunny west coast of the Island of Hawaiʻi, lies the beautiful Waikoloa Beach Resort. With minimal rainfall, and plenty of daily sunshine, it’s the perfect location for a water adventure or an easy hike through ancient petroglyph fields and historical temples.  ʻAnaehoʻomalu, or A-Bay, is the picturesque beach and recreation area located at Waikoloa Beach Resort. It’s the perfect spot to sip a tropical cocktail and watch the sunset or experience one of the many ocean activities available to sea lovers. Snorkelers, windsurfers and swimmers love the warm water and scenic beauty of this popular destination. Take a sunset cocktail cruise, or explore the ocean floor and colorful coral reefs on a glass-bottom boat. However you choose to spend the day at A-Bay, it’s sure to give you a host of lifelong memories. Archaeology buffs will revel in the numerous petroglyphs and stone etchings that are scattered throughout Waikoloa Beach Resort. Early Hawaiians had no written language, therefore scholars believe that petroglyphs were used to communicate important information such as astronomical knowledge, directions for travelers, or significant historical events. There is a clearly marked petroglyph trail that is located near the King’s Shops gas station. Free, guided tours are offered Thursday through Sunday at 9:30 a.m. It’s strongly advised to not touch these archeological treasures, as they are thousands of years old and are easily damaged. However, feel free to bring your camera and take plenty of photographs. In addition to harvesting wild fish, early Hawaiians also practiced aquafarming, the cultivation of freshwater and saltwater sea life. The area around Waikoloa was known for this thriving aquaculture. Two of these ancient fishponds, Ku‘uali‘i and Kahapapa, are located just behind the beach at A-Bay. These ponds were cared for by families who passed down the knowledge to subsequent generations along with stories of young runners who would deliver fresh fish from the ponds to King Kamehameha at his residence in Kailua-Kona. This is a sacred and protected area, so please stay on the trail!

Waikoloa Beach Resort